Oregon Pollinator Protection Act

ACTION ALERT: Send a FAST RESPONSE letter to all 5 members of the Senate Committee On Environment and Natural Resources!
JOIN US in Salem: Monday, March 27th, 3 PM: Hearing Room C in the Capitol Building in Salem.
Read the overview: Oregon Pollinator Protection Act – SB 929 (PDF)

SB 929 | Summary
Requires State Department of Agriculture to classify neonicotinoids as restricted use pesticides. Requires department to restrict sale and use of pesticide products containing neonicotinoids. Creates exceptions. Requires that information concerning restrictions on neonicotinoid use be included in educational materials developed by Oregon State University and department. | The bill as introduced

Consumers are Unsuspecting Users of Dangerous, Bio-Persistent Pesticides
Pesticide labels don’t warn consumers about the uptake of neonicotinoids through tissue in trees and plants. Shoppers assume that products sold at garden and grocery stores are completely safe. People are less likely to read pesticide labels under the assumption that products are safe. Oregon currently protects people from 500 dangerous pesticides.

The Benefits of the Oregon Pollinator Protection Act:
The Oregon Pollinator Protection Act will place necessary restrictions on neonicotinoid pesticides (adding them to the list of RESTRICTED USE PESTICIDES) for consumers’ purchase and use. Oregon already has rules to keep nearly 500 dangerous pesticides out of the hands of untrained consumers; it makes sense that neonicotinoids, highly toxic and bio-persistent, should be added to this list. This bill does not change the availability of neonicotinoids to professional applicators, farmers or veterinarians who are trained and licensed.

Oregon will join more than 20 states, cities, federal agencies and universities that have already taken steps to restrict neonicotinoids, including Portland, Eugene and Milwaukie. Oregon can be a leader in the protection and preservation of these insects so vital to and intertwined with our natural ecosystem and local agriculture.

See the businesses and non-profits that have endorsed SB 929

TAKE ACTION

Please attend the first open hearing for SB 929: JOIN US in Salem for the first hearing: Monday, March 27th at 3 PM in front of the Senate Committee On Environment and Natural ResourcesHearing Room C in the Capitol Building in Salem. Call us for bus rides: 541-465-8860.

You must send a letter to this email address for it to be uploaded to the Committee’s central OLIS document and considered by the Senate Committee on Environment and Natural Resources: senr.exhibits@oregonlegislature.gov.

You can also send individual emails to all 5 members of the Senate Committee on Environment and Natural Resources to urge their strong support for SB 929, the Oregon Pollinator Protection Act.

Chair: Senator Michael Dembrow – Capitol Phone: 503-986-1723 | Email
Vice-Chair: Senator Alan Olsen – Capitol Phone: 503-986-1720 | Email
Member: Senator Herman Baertschiger Jr. – Capitol Phone: 503-986-1702 | Email
Member: Senator Floyd Prozanski – Capitol Phone: 503-986-1704 | Email
Member: Senator Arnie Roblan – Capitol Phone: 503-986-1705 | Email

Don’t forget to also write your own state legislators and urge their support. If you’d like to contact your state Senator (Senate) or Representative (House), but are unsure of who represents you, please look them up here: Find Your Oregon Legislator.

Sample Phone Scripts and Sample Email Messages

#1 Pollinators are Keystone Species

Key points for your phone call:

– Native pollinators are a keystone species and play a critical role in sustaining 90% of Oregon’s plant life.
– Oregon’s native pollinators are rapidly declining.
– Bee-killing pesticides are too toxic and persistent for the general public. They must be restricted to professional use only.

Key points for your email:

Dear Senate Committee for Environment and Natural Resources,

I am writing today because of my appreciation for the value of bees in my life (briefly describe why saving bees is important to you personally).

Oregon’s native pollinators are now some of the most elusive species in the entire Pacific Northwest. For example, our Fender’s blue butterfly, Taylor’s Checkerspot Butterfly, Franklin’s Bumblebee, and even the Western Bumblebee populations have rapidly disappeared across Oregon’s landscape. Not only are we destroying crucial pollinator habitat, but people are indiscriminately spraying highly toxic and systemic neonicotinoid-containing pesticides. Neonicotinoids have been strongly linked to the decline in bee survival. This ecological catastrophe puts our ecosystems and food systems in peril. It is urgent that Oregon take action NOW to save bees from extinction! The Oregon Pollinator Protection Act will prevent homeowners from reaching for bee-killing pesticides on store shelves and bringing these poisons home. This will make a significant difference in the survival of native bees across
the state! The last place for dangerous and persistent poisons is in the yards of Oregon homeowners.

Please, help protect Oregon’s landscape by adding much-needed protections for our keystone pollinator species. Protecting Oregon’s pollinators from highly toxic pesticides protects Oregonians from a bare and desolate landscape in years to come.

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#2 Systemic Pesticides in Residential Garden Environments

Key points for your phone call:

– Without the passage of SB 929, anyone can buy highly toxic chemicals that cause major bee die-offs and use them indiscriminately on private property.
– Neonicotinoid-containing pesticides are systemic, meaning they can move through every part of a plant and into the soil. They cannot be washed off.
– Neonicotinoids are extremely persistent and can remain active in the soil and water for nearly a decade.
– These toxic chemicals are polluting our water, soil, and important wildlife habitat.

Key points for your email:

Dear Senate Committee for Environment and Natural Resources,

I am writing today because of my appreciation for the value of bees in my life (briefly, describe why saving bees is important to you personally).

Seven major bee die-offs occurred in Oregon just two years ago – in each case, the investigation conducted by the Department of Agriculture concluded that the cause of the deaths of hundreds of thousands of bees was due to exposure to neonicotinoids.

Neonicotinoids are the most widely sold pesticides in the US – they are the active ingredient in common garden and lawn products. Neonicotinoids are water soluble and systemic pesticides, meaning they are taken up in the vascular system of a treated plant, thereby rendering the whole plant toxic. Systemic pesticides don’t wash off. The toxic ingredients become part of the nectar, the pollen, and even the moisture, or sweat, of the plant. Bees are poisoned as they pollinate flowers.

The harm doesn’t stop there. The use of neonicotinoids has led to widespread contamination of soil, puddles, streams, groundwater, lakes, rivers, and marine areas. With colonies of honey bees declining nearly 40% in 2015, and native bees landing on Endangered Species lists, and with widespread neonicotinoid contamination in US waterways exceeding recommended standards – we must not wait to take action on neonicotinoids in Oregon.

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#3 Fish and Bird Habitat

Key points for your phone call:

– Neonicotinoids damage important fish and bird habitat.
– Decreases in bird populations are most rapid in areas most heavily polluted with neonicotinoids.
– These declines impact anglers, bird hunters, bird watchers, nature enthusiasts, tourists,  photographers, artists, etc….
– Neonicotinoids are having major environmental impacts from urban uses and must be restricted to professional use only.

Key points for your email:

Dear Senate Committee for Environment and Natural Resources,

I am writing today because of my appreciation for the value of bees in my life (briefly describe why saving bees is important to you personally).

Many different kinds of people need healthy fish and bird habitat: anglers, hunters, birdwatchers, writers, artists. Studies have found that higher levels of neonicotinoids in water reduced the levels of aquatic invertebrates, which are the main food for a whole range of species including wading birds, trout and salmon. There is so much evidence, going far beyond bees, that neonicotinoids are harming our planet. They accumulate in soils, they are commonly turning up in waterways at levels that higher than the lethal dose for the animals that live in streams.

It is impossible to deny that neonicotinoids are having major environmental impacts. A study published in Nature shows that decreases in bird populations are most rapid in areas that are most heavily polluted with neonicotinoids, suggesting that the environmental damage inflicted by these insecticides may be much broader than previously thought. Current use of neonicotinoids is likely to have a major impact on a wide range of non-target species including pollinators and soil and aquatic invertebrates and hence threatens a range of ecosystem services as well.

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#4 Biodiversity: Health of Rivers and Streams

Key points for your phone call:

– Field studies have demonstrated the persistent nature of neonicotinoid pesticides in soil and waterways.
– The health of Oregon’s rivers and streams depends on an immediate reduction of neonicotinoid use.
– Pesticides are causing major damage to biodiversity and ecosystems.
– Pollination comprises an integrated system of interactions that links earth’s vegetation, wildlife, and human welfare.

Key points for your email:

Dear Senate Committee for Environment and Natural Resources,

I am writing today because of my appreciation for the value of bees in my life (briefly, describe why saving bees is important to you personally).

Every year new reports conclusively show that neonicotinoids – the world’s most widely used pesticides – cause major damage to biodiversity and ecosystems. Pesticide pollution is also highest in the spring when people plant their seeds. That’s an ecologically sensitive time of year: Many migratory birds are returning from South and Central America, and rely on a springtime flush of insect life to regain their strength and breed. We need to move from these temporary “band-aid” solutions to methods that work with nature rather than against it.

Neonicotinoids are affecting ecosystems at levels much lower than what is indicated on the pesticide labels. Unsuspecting homeowners making applications to lawns and gardens and to trees, result in neonicotinoids entering creeks and wetlands through runoff, leaching, and drift. In fact, EPA’s incident records show that runoff from one urban lawn application in Ohio killed 3,000 crayfish in a nearby stream! Just one application of these pesticides can stay active in soil and water for 10 years and continue to harm our soil microorganisms and aquatic species.

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Sign the Preserve A World Without Bees petition TODAY!


ENDORSERS

    1. Non-profits:

Asante Three Rivers Medical Center
Audubon Society of Portland
Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project
Cascadia Wildlands
Center for Biological Diversity
Center for Food Safety
Coast Range Forest Watch
Defenders of Wildlife
Friends of Family Farmers
Friends of Trees
Hells Canyon Preservation Council
Kalmiopsis Audubon Society
KS Wild
Lane County Audubon
Lomakatsi Restoration Project
Native Plant Society of Oregon – Siskiyou Chapter
Oregon Chapter of the Sierra Club
Oregon Conservation Network
Oregon Environmental Council
Oregon Natural Desert Association
Oregon Wild
Oregon Student Public Interest Research Group (OSPIRG) – Southern Oregon University
OSPIRG – University of Orgeon
OSPIRG – Lane Community College
Our Family Farms
Pacific Rivers Council
Pollinator Parkways
Pollinator Project Rogue Valley
Rogue Valley Audubon Society
Rogue Climate
Southern Oregon Monarch Advocates
Southern Oregon Seed Growers Association
Trout Unlimited
Umpqua Watersheds
Walama Restoration Project
Willamette Farm and Food Coalition

    Business Supporters:

GloryBee
Mountain Rose Herbs
Hummingbird Wholesale
Coconut Bliss
Bee Thinking
AVEDA
LUSH
NatureLee Inspired
Klamath-Siskiyou Native Seeds
Katalyst, Inc.
Self & Soul Center
Breeze Botanicals, LLC
Oshala Farm
Out of the Flame
Garden Fever!
Urban Bees and Gardens
Zitavex Labs, LLC
Wandering Roots Farm
Oregon Premier Locations
Silver Springs Nursery, Inc.

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Are you a business or non-profit that would like endorse SB 929, the Oregon Pollinator Protection Act? Just sign the endorsement form below and click on SUBMIT! Thank you!

Oregon Pollinator Protection Act Business and Non-profit Endorsement Form

Please complete this form to officially register your business or organization an as an endorser of the Oregon Pollinator Protection Act (SB 929).

 


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