Posts Categorized: Bees

Crow Feather Farm

Beyond Toxics is publicizing local gardens friendly to our increasingly fragile population of pollinators. In this blog we visit Jessica Jackowski’s garden in Eugene. Along a path at Crow Feather Farm, borage blossoms unfurl in spirals. A honeybee dances among them, then attaches herself upside down to a nectar-rich mini-grotto, proboscis sucking up sweetness. A… Read more »

The Bee, the Puppy and You!

This week national environmental leaders in bee protection, including Beyond Toxics, signed on to letters sent to Ace and True Value Hardware stores asking them to act now to protect bees! Our petition is for Ace and True Value to commit to not sell products containing systemic neonicotinoid pesticides harmful to bees, butterflies, birds and… Read more »

The Humble Bumble Gets Its Own Day of Gratitude

Have you been enjoying watching the furry bumble bees visiting your garden flowers? They seem to be out-and-about, buzzing the blossoms just at dawn, and hanging around for that last nectary drop even as the sun sets. Cherish them as they flirt with your oregano and lavender. Despite their apparent bounty in your garden, native… Read more »

My wish for the New Year: No More Bee Kills!

By now, the whole world knows that seven documented bumble bee kill incidents happened in Oregon during 2013-2014. These bee slaughters were caused by applications of neonicotinoid insecticides. I described how the ground was littered with the convulsing bodies of bumble and honey bees. The total kill count, upwards of 100,000 bumble bees, did not… Read more »

Bees, pesticides and freedom

When I read the Oregonian’s “Editors’ Agenda 2014” editorial (1/5/2014), I felt compelled to respond. The editors urged Oregonians to pay attention to upcoming statewide issues that may either increase or decrease personal freedoms. One of the legislative bills they warn against is HB 4139, the Save Oregon Pollinators Act. Beyond Toxics is partnering with… Read more »

Bees by the Numbers

“Bees are as important to Oregon’s agricultural sector as water and the sun.” – Alan Turanski, VP, GloryBee Foods There are a lot of reasons to be concerned about the rapid decline of many species of bees worldwide. Honey bees and bumble bees have played a crucial role in human cultures for thousands of years…. Read more »