Promote pollinators and bee-friendly plants in the spring

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

To coordinate interviews with either or both business people, please contact Lisa Arkin or Krystal Abrams at the Beyond Toxics office: 541-465-8860 during business hours.



Promote pollinators and bee-friendly plants in the spring for best summer vegetable gardens

Portland, Ore. – With hints of warmth in Oregon’s spring air and a bit of sun peeking through, Oregon gardeners are eagerly getting ready with seeds, trowels and gardening gloves. Local gardening experts are available to offer the best tips for the healthiest and most productive garden ever!

Portland-based Garden Fever is a garden center that offers classes and talks about non-toxic gardening in addition to selling plants and tools also. Portland Urban Bees and Gardens helps people support urban beekeeping.

Eagerness sometimes can lead to rushing into decisions about pest control that can lead to disastrous consequences.

Garden Fever owner Lori Vollmer says, “It’s pretty basic science. In order to get vegetables, you need insects to pollinate the vegetable flowers. This is an undeniable fact.”

Plants that provide food for and attract pollinating insects are key for a lush vegetable garden. When people think of insects, they often mistakenly think they should kill them. Not so. Urban gardens can attract beneficial insects and reduce pests by using effective, non-toxic products. It is critical to avoid using pesticides that poison the pollen and nectar of plants feeding the insects pollinating your vegetable flowers.

Likewise, Brian Lacy of Urban Bees and Gardens urges gardeners to remember that pollinators are fragile insects that need your support. “Not only do the use of poisons in one garden kill the visiting bees,” says Lacy, “It also can kill bees back in the hive where baby bees are waiting for pollen and nectar to survive.”

In order to have success in growing vegetables for your family to enjoy, follow these basic, common sense practices.
• Plant flowers and plants that pollinators love to visit. They need these plants to give them nectar and pollen for nourishment.
• Use garden products that are not poisonous to beneficial insects such as bees, butterflies, lady beetles and praying mantises. In particular avoid products with neonicotinoid poisons.
• Use soil amendments that are free of pesticides.

To coordinate interviews with either or both business people, please contact Lisa Arkin or Krystal Abrams at the Beyond Toxics office: 541-465-8860 during business hours.

Read more about creating a bee-friendly garden.

STORY IMAGES:
Bee-friendly plants pictured: Nepeta Blue Dragon, Oregon Oxalis and Solidago Fireworks