Beyond Toxics’ 2019 Legislative Program

Oregon State Capitol, Salem

2019 LEGISLATIVE EFFORTS
Beyond Toxics is organizing a strong coalition of Oregon businesses, environmental and racial justice organizations working together to modernize our pesticide laws. This pesticide reform package will protect water, community health and wildlife. Now is the time to reverse bee declines, end pesticide drift and protect children from brain damaging pesticides.coalition of Oregon businesses, environmental and racial justice organizations are working together to modernize our pesticide laws. This pesticide reform package will protect water, community health and wildlife. Now is the time to reverse bee declines, end pesticide drift and protect children from brain damaging pesticides.

OVERVIEW: Essential pesticide protection opportunities in 2019 are:

  • Add neonicotinoids to the statewide list of Restricted Use Pesticides (i.e. remove them from consumer store shelves). Neonics are highly toxic to insects, pollinators, fish, birds, and freshwater invertebrates. They are highly bio-persistent and can contaminate streams and wetlands for years.
  • Working for a statewide ban on chlorpyrifos, an insecticide that was originally slated to be banned by the US EPA before the current administration reversed course. Scientific studies have linked chlorpyrifos to brain damage in children, autism, cancer, reduced IQ, loss of working memory, attention deficit disorders and Parkinson’s disease.
  • Modernize and create permanent funding for the Oregon’s Pesticide Use Reporting System (PURS).

Download the Overview 1-pager (PDF)


Photo by Sherrie Pelsma

RESTRICT BEE-KILLING NEONICOTINOIDS [Bill Numbers: HB 3058 and SB 853]
Neonicotinoids (neonics) are a class of synthetic, neurotoxic pesticides widely used on a range of crops and ornamentals. They can persist in the environment many years after their application and are highly toxic to bees, beneficial insects, fish and birds. We urge the Oregon Legislative Assembly to add these bee-killing pesticides to Oregon’s list of Restricted Use Pesticides. This step would remove neonic containing products from consumer store shelves, require training and a license to apply them and reduce their impact in urban areas.

Read the handout: “Neonicotinoids degrade soil and water” – PDF

PROTECT FARM-WORKERS & BIODIVERSITY [Bill Numbers: HB 3058 and SB 853]
For 50 years chlorpyrifos, a neurotoxic pesticide, has been damaging children’s brains and harming farm workers and contaminating our food. The EPA was ordered by federal courts to ban this dangerous pesticide from use on food crops. Oregon should take the strongest possible action to protect farm workers, children, the safety of our food and the environment with a statewide ban on chlorpyrifos. We can no longer wait for a dysfunctional EPA to take action. Hawaii has already banned chlorpyrifos and other states are taking action as well. | Find out how you can get involved to help BAN Chlorpyrifos in Oregon

Read the handout: Chlorpyrifos Harms People (p. 1: English and p. 2: Spanish) – PDF

We have both Senate and House support so there are two bills to make sure this issue was brought to the attention of legislators and the public.

Chief sponsors of HB 3058: Rep. Sanchez, Rep. Keny Guyer, Rep. Hernandez, Rep. Neron.
Bill Co-sponsors: Sen. Burdick, Sen. Dembrow, Sen. Manning, Sen. Fagan, Sen. Golden, Sen. Prozanski, Sen. Monnes Anderson, Sen. Steiner Hayward, Sen. Taylor, Sen. Wagner, Rep. Alonso Leon, Rep. Holvey, Rep. Prusak, Rep. Salinas, Rep. Wilde

Chief sponsors of SB 853: Sen. Dembrow, Sen. Manning, Sen. Fagan, Sen. Golden, Sen. Prozanski, Rep. Neron, Rep. Hernandez, Rep. Keny Guyer
Bill Co-sponsors: Sen. Burdick, Sen. Dembrow, Sen. Manning, Sen. Fagan, Sen. Golden, Sen. Prozanski, Sen. Monnes Anderson, Sen. Steiner Hayward, Sen. Taylor, Sen. Wagner, Rep. Helm, Rep. Marsh, Rep. Alonso Leon, Rep. Holvey, Rep. Prusak, Rep. Salinas, Rep. Wilde, Rep. Sanchez

PROHIBIT AERIAL HERBICIDE SPRAYING ON STATE-OWNED FOREST LANDS. [Bill Numbers: SB 926, HB 3221]
Oregon law allows helicopters to spray dangerous herbicides on many thousands of acres of state forests. These forests provide drinking water to downstream communities. Aerial herbicide sprays are ultra-hazardous because herbicides can drift for miles. Our state forests and public funds should not be used to put drinking water and rural communities at risk of being exposed to herbicides. | Find out how you can get involved to help prohibit aerial herbicide spraying on state-owned forest lands->>

UPDATE OREGON’S FOREST ACTIVITY ELECTRONIC REPORTING AND NOTIFICATION SYSTEM (FERNS) [Bill Number: SB 931]
The Oregon Dept. of Forestry’s online forest activities notification system needs improvement. This easy-to-use system can help rural residents protect themselves from aerial herbicide sprays on private industrial timber plantations. These necessary updates will include:

  • Notify residents 48 hours prior to herbicide sprays
  • Distinguish between aerial and ground sprays
  • Report types and amounts of pesticides used to the state regulators.
  • Keep forestry spray records for 7 years (instead of 3 years)

Find out how you can get involved to help update Oregon’s
online forest activities notification system->>

DEVELOP PESTICIDE USE DATA SETS AND FUND PESTICIDE USE REPORTING [Bill Number TBA]
Pesticides are natural resource management tools. However, they also contaminate rivers, and soils and harm people and wildlife. That’s why Oregon passed a law to require Pesticide Use Reporting over 20 years ago. This program only collected 2 years of data before being defunded and is now slated to end in 2019. Modern technology makes it easy to collect accurate data on how pesticides are being used and where pesticides are going in the environment. Now is the time to commit to a long-term, comprehensive pesticide reporting system for better science-based environmental protections.


This year, the Oregon Conservation Network has recognized the urgency of reducing the risk of harm from pesticides, for humans, wildlife and the environment and the convenience of using modern technology to report and track pesticide use. By a unanimous vote, the Oregon Conservation Network adopted Pesticides Policy Reform as one of their top five 2019 Priorities for a Healthy Oregon.