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Bees, pesticides and freedom

Our freedoms come with responsibilities when our actions may affect, directly or indirectly, people’s welfare and the environment. The responsible person asks the question of what is at risk. We think that Oregonians want responsible legislation that helps prevent unintended harm and death to the hard working bees that make home gardens and bountiful harvests possible.

Philip Smith with his hives - summer, 2013

Bees by the Numbers

There are a lot of reasons to be concerned about the rapid decline of many species of bees worldwide. Honey bees and bumble bees have played a crucial role in human cultures for thousands of years. Today, even with more industrialized modern agriculture, the humble bee (both native and domesticated bee species) still plays a remarkably important role in bringing food to the tables of people all around the world.

Photo by Rebecca Finley

Bees Get Their Day at the State Legislature

The Legislative hearing on Bee Health and Pesticide Use on November 21 was an important milestone.  Lawmakers heard from a number of panelists that pesticides are harming bees.

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Oregon lacking in the science of forestry

Profitable timber production can readily coexist with protections for water quality and community health.  That is the lesson of commercial logging operations in Washington, California and even Idaho.

Then there is the way we do it in Oregon.

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The future of Oregon’s clean-flowing drinking water

Over the past few months The Register-Guard has held a back-and-forth debate about Oregon Rep. Peter DeFazio’s plan to increase logging in Oregon’s federal forests.

What’s at stake? Nothing less than the future of Oregon’s clean-flowing drinking water.

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Oregon and pesticides: our chance to make a stand for safety

Oregon has become somewhat of a focal point for pesticide issues.  That is hardly cause for celebration for a state that wears its green credentials on its sleeve. The only hope is that Oregon will respond to the crisis with better regulations, safer policies and a commitment to protecting Oregon from pesticide poisoning.

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New pesticide reduction law a significant win

Protecting human health has always been a race between action and disaster. Consider how long society waited to remove lead from gasoline and paint, and the disaster that inaction inflicted upon generations of children and their brain development. As our technologies race ahead of our prudence, we’ve learned that local actions can have universal ramifications, for better or worse.

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What’s Up with Brownfields and Environmental Justice?

The City of Eugene, the City of Springfield, and Lane County are looking for public input in the process of finding, cleaning up and redeveloping brownfields. Brownfields are abandoned properties that are not being re-purposed because of the likely presence of hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants.  Brownfield result in neighborhood “blight;” they make people feel unsafe and they drag down property values.

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Victory is Sweet!

WE DID IT!  The Safe Public Places Bill has passed in both chambers of the Oregon Legislature and will be signed into law this week!  What a sweet victory!

No exaggeration!  Beyond Toxics researched the issue, wrote the language and fought hard to pass both bills that reduce pesticides in Oregon.

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Toxic exposure against our will

Roundup, the herbicide that contains glyphosate, has gotten a lot of international press in the past week.  And none of it is good news for us living beings who are exposed to Roundup in our food and in the environment.

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Please join us in working for a world beyond toxics.

Beyond Toxics is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and all contributions are fully tax-deductible.
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Contact

Lane County Office
120 Shelton McMurphey Blvd.
Suite 280
Eugene, OR 97401

+1 (541) 465-8860

Jackson County Office
312 N. Main St., Suite B
Phoenix, Oregon 97535

+1 (541) 465-8860 ext. 2

Mailing Address
P.O. Box 1106
Eugene, OR 97440

Hours
Daily: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed

info@beyondtoxics.org

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